Hamilton House
Bed & Breakfast

Whitewater, Wisconsin

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May 7, 2019 by: Kathleen Fleming

Wildflower Hikes & Mushroom Foraging

Wildflower Hikes & Mushroom Foraging

Spring is one of our favorite times of the year in the Whitewater area. Once the snow melts and the weather starts to warm, beautiful local wildflowers and plant life begin to sprout from the ground, making it the perfect season for hikes and mushroom foraging. Spring is the ultimate time to get outdoors and marvel at the wonders of nature in Southeastern Wisconsin. Read on for everything you need to know about wildflower hikes and mushroom foraging throughout the region.

There are a variety of wonderful wildflower trails stretching all throughout the Kettle Moraine State Forest. Many of the loops on the Emma Carlin Trail, including the Brown Loop and the Green Loop, overflow with gorgeous spring blooms. In addition, the Bald Bluff Trail is a lovely 3.4 mile out-and-back trail notable for its breathtaking views and abundance of wildflowers. The Ice Age Trail Alliance for Jefferson/Walworth County also offers a variety of spring group hikes where you can learn about local flowers with the help of a friendly and informed guide. They offer weekly walks and special interest programs. Remember that these trails can also be explored on bike if that is your preferred method for adventure.


If you’ve never tried mushroom foraging before, the Whitewater area is an incredible place to start. On a guided trip, you’ll learn all about how to identify edible and non-edible fungi while exploring the beautiful forests of Wisconsin and getting to know other like-minded nature lovers. During the Springtime, Kettle Moraine State Park sprouts with many wild morels you can forage for on your own or with a trained guide. Wildflower hikes and mushroom foraging trips are a wonderful way to get outside and experience the wonders of spring in Whitewater.


Planning a trip to Whitewater, Wisconsin? Book a stay at the lovely Hamilton House Bed & Breakfast, located just minutes from Kettle Moraine State Park.

 

 

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